HSE

The annual report by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) includes statistics for work-related ill health

The annual report by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) includes statistics for work-related ill health, workplace injuries, working days lost, enforcement action taken, and the associated costs to Great Britain.

Figures show that around 581,000 workers sustained non-fatal injuries in 2018/2019, with 1.4 million workers suffering from work-related ill-health.

The statistics, compiled from the Labour Force Survey (LFS) and other sources, illustrate that in Great Britain in the 2018/2019 period there were;

147 fatal injuries at work

1.4 million working people suffering from a work-related illness

364 cases were prosecuted and resulted in a conviction; fines from convictions totalled £54.5 million

28.2 million working days lost due to work-related illness and workplace injury

The estimated economic cost to Great Britain totalled £15 billion in 2017/2018.

There have been no significant changes to industries in which there is a higher risk of sustaining an injury while at work, with construction and agriculture still amongst the high-risk sectors.

Despite Great Britain continuing to be one of the safest places to work, the reported figures highlight there are still areas to be improved upon to prevent fatalities, injuries and ill-health. The figures highlight the scale of the challenge HSE currently faces in making Britain a healthier and safer place to work.

In response to the report, Martin Temple, HSE Chair, said: "Great Britain's position as one of the safest places to work should be a point of pride for us all, but these figures show there is still much to be done to ensure workers go home both healthy and safe.

"These figures should highlight to us all the vital importance of managing risk and promoting behaviours to improve the standard of good health and safety practice in the workplace."

"We must all share the responsibility of ensuring everybody is aware of what they need to do to work right by preventing work-related incidents, and making our places of work healthier and safer for everyone."

The full annual injury and ill-health statistics report can be found on HSE Website

http://www.hse.gov.uk/statistics/?utm_source=pressrelease&utm_medium=referral&utm_campaign=annualstats&utm_term=statistics&utm_content=illhealthandinjury

Septic Tank Law is Changing

You must read septic tanks and treatment plants: permits and general binding rules before you follow this guidance.

The requirements changed on 1 January 2015. If your system was installed and discharging before 31 December 2014 you have an ‘existing discharge’. If your system was installed and discharging on or after 1 January 2015 you have a ‘new discharge’.

If your discharge causes pollution you may be committing an offence. The Environment Agency will give you advice to help you fix the problem. If your discharge continues to cause pollution the Environment Agency may take enforcement action against you.

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/general-binding-rules-small-sewage-discharge-to-a-surface-water

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